SMS Spam: taking it personally

We have just release a survey and white paper into mobile user’s attitude towards spam messages. It revealed some interesting results – one of them was that people take SMS spam very personally.

68% of our respondents had received some kind of SMS spam.

If you’ve received a spam SMS, do you remember what it was? Chances are you do. How many spam messages have you ever received? One or two? I suspect it’s a handful at most.

Now compare that with email. Do you know the last spam message you got? Quite unlikely. Do you know how many you have ever had? Or how many in the last week? Or last day? I doubt that many people know the answer to this.

So why do we remember mobile spam so clearly? Naturally there are relatively few spam text messages, so that is part of the reason. But the other part is that most of us take it very personally. When you think about it, that’s hardly surprising. Most of us are just a few feet away from our mobile phone at all times. If we forget it when we leave the house most of us feel lost without it. It’s the device that we text our loves on. We customise them with backgrounds and ringtones. Increasingly it’s also the place where we store our personal photos. How many other technology devices do we have that kind of relationship with?

So, the mobile phone IS personal. If you are marketing to phones, you need to understand that it is the case, and be very mindful of the relationship through the phone.

That’s not to say that we don’t want marketing messages on our phone. We do. The study also showed that 55% are happy to receive offers and promotions from brands that they have selected. The point is that mobile users want CONTROL. And lots of it.

The other day I received messages from two restaurants. I had given them my mobile number as part of a booking over a year a go. They didn’t ask me if I wanted to receive these messages. They just assumed that I did. It was quite within the regulations to send such messages as a soft opt-in, but I was understandably put out. I complained to both restaurants.

The study also showed that we want to choose the time of day and frequency of the messages we receive. So, if brands want to market to mobile phones, there are plenty of people happy to receive that information. But they shouldn’t assume that we all automatically want to be told about everything. Brands need to seek permission and give users control over what and when they receive their messages.

Please click the following link if you would like to read the Mobile Spam Survey in full.

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