Five iPhone 5’s Which Never Happened

Here are five iPhone’s which don’t actually exist:

Tell people an iPhone 4S is a ‘5’ and see what happens :

The projected keyboard on this concept phone caused quite a stir and many people thought it was real:

Great concept of a future phone, it will probably be the iPhone 9:

A camera is ultimately only as good as the lens. Here’s one (bulky) solution:

When the iPhone 4 first appeared with reception problems (the Death Grip), some wag created this concept for the next generation iPhone:

iPhone 5: What’s the Impact on Mobile Marketing

Not the iPhone 5 (obviously), it’s the iPhone 7 of course.

The best round-up of the new iPhone 5 (6th generation) comes from The Next Web. From a mobile marketing standpoint, do the changes have any real impact?

Given that the original iPhone (and app store) changed the face of mobile marketing, any update from Apple may have a significant impact. Although the updates to the iPhone were essentially incremental, there will be some changes for marketers:

Larger Screen – the impact is not significant, delivering a slightly better user experience, however by introducing a new size, this may well impact on app builds and particularly legacy apps. Will brands be up to spending more money on development? Could this drive more businesses to choosing web and responsive design over apps?

4G Support – brands need to provide a rich content engagement. Access to the rapid growth of 4G networks will open up a whole new world of brand content and is probably the most significant update from a marketing perspective.

No NFC – this is also significant for marketing … a significant disappointment. It was unlikely that Apple would have shoved an NFC chip in their handset – they like to do things their own way and define the market. However, we know that iPhone users tend to drive demand and activity – web browsing, app downloads and mobile social media , have all been boosted by Apple’s smartphone users. If we want to see NFC driving forwards then seeing it in an iPhone is the best way to do it.

Siri – this has yet be used as a marketing channel, so the updates have little impact (especially if you are outside the US)

Finally (though not on the subject of mobile marketing) the end of Ping was announced. Apple have never been a social network business, and the launch of their music recommendation system was never likely to succeed (I was bemused by it when they Ping it two years ago). The company’s real foray into social media came last year with the deep integration of Twitter in to iOS.

iPhone 5 to have NFC (Contactless Payments)

All the signs are there that the next iPhone will include contactless:

  1. Richard Doherty, director of consulting firm Envisioneering Group who work on NFC hardware, told Bloomberg that the next iPhones/iPads will have NFC.
  2. AppleInsider has discovered that Apple this week put out a call for an engineer with NFC experience.
  3. Apple filed a number of NFC related patents in 2010.

Aside from all these signs, NFC makes a lot of sense for Apple. At the moment their itunes store pays massive transaction charges for purchases bought on credit cards. Though highly profitable, it would be much cheaper for Apple to see more NFC payments which would debit a bank account and reducing their transaction costs. Google have already added NFC to their Nexus S, but the addition of a contactless iPhone will make the technology almost inevitable.

The infrastructure of contactless is appearing in many countries – aside from Japan and Korea who have had contactless phones for years, the US now has 750,000 contactless payment terminals. In the UK similar NFC devices are being rolled out in numerous shops and restaurants where there are 42,500 contactless payment points. Barclaycard and Everything Everywhere (Orange and T-Mobile) re-announced their plans to deliver a contactless handset from April 2011. With the payment technology added to phones there technological barriers to contactless will be removed. Of course, there is still one big ‘if’ with the whole – will users want to adopt it? It looks like the handset manufacturers (and banks and operators) are assuming they will. However, mobile is littered with technologies that users weren’t interested in (in spite of Face Time, how many people actually make a video call?). When it comes to NFC payments the big question from users will be security. How easy will it be for someone to get hold of my money?